Bradley Newman
Alexander Technique


Are Your Insides Roomy Enough?

On Posture and Digestion


We are what we eat. But do you make the most of what you eat?


When it comes to helping and improving digestion, there are a couple of obvious things to consider. Firstly, what we put in our mouths is clearly important, so a sensible diet with good quality food is helpful. Secondly, we need the best conditions present in our digestive system, so healthy gut flora is necessary.

But one aspect often not considered is space. How much space are you giving your stomach and intestines? And is it enough for them to do their job efficiently?


How’s your Inner Self for Space?

We are all gradually growing into a posture that reflects what we do day in, day out. Most of us have pretty good posture when we’re kids, and so we also have enough space within us for our organs for function efficiently. As we age though, we develop habits which interfere with our younger, more natural posture. We may start to slump a lot, or stiffen and tighten with more stress as we age. Over years, and then decades, we gradually grow into a posture that reflects these habits. So you may have slowly grown into a compressed, squashed posture already without really noticing it. If so, your health will be affected by this in many ways. And one of these is your digestive system.


Do you have the stomach for it?

If you have grown into a compressed shape, then you will be limiting the amount of space your stomach and intestines have to operate in. And this will be affecting how well they can function. So while good diet and healthy gut flora are clearly important, you will be restricting your body’s ability to make the most of these if you are compressing and squashing yourself. And as these changes happen gradually, you may be doing this without realising it. You may have been interfering with your digestion for years, without knowing it.


How are you growing today?

Alexander Technique helps people grow into a healthy shape, a posture where there is room for their bodies to function as efficiently as possible - enough length to have a healthy spine; enough space to have lungs which breathe freely and fully; and enough space for our digestive systems to not be squashed, compressed, and restricted.

So how much space do you have right now? And do you think it’s enough?


Bradley Newman teaches the Alexander Technique in Sydney. For more information see alexandersydneywest.com.au or email Bradley on .